Flower plates or about a narrow exposure range of tintypes.

March 31, 2015  •  Leave a Comment

 

This could be a litany about my fascination with flowers. Or, if I would play on my rusty string of conceptualism, a short reflection about time, beauty and death. But this is not what I want to talk about.

When you are making tintypes, you have very little space for exposure error. Shortening or extending of developing time deteriorate the quality of the tonal range of the final plate and can't be used as a regular method of correction of over or under exposed plates.

These plates were made in one week span. Couple on the bottom with the light from the window with UV protected glass in a sunny bright day. Couple with a dry flower was made in a dully dark rainy day with light from window with simple glass. The similarity of exposure times is a pure coincident.

What is not a coincidence is the difference produced by a relatively small change in the exposure time. In both cases there are the lightest and the darkest acceptable version of pictures. Anything with shorter exposure will be too dark, anything with longer exposure will be too light. It looks that with tintypes you should hit the exposure in plus minus twenty percent range. What is your experience? Do you have any tips or tricks, how to deal with under or overexposed plates? 

Some of my plates are on eBay

 

 

 


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